U.S. History Course Syllabus

U.S. History Class

Onalaska High School

Fall Semester – 2014

Mr. Bower

 

SCOPE:            Social Studies helps students become responsible citizens in a culturally

                        diverse, democratic society within an interdependent world.  Through the

                        exploration of history, geography, economics, and civics, students learn

                        about the people, places, issues, eras, and events that shape the

                        Unites States.

 

Unite Outlines for U.S. History 11:

 

  • US – Our Foundations (1776 – 1791)
  • US – Industrialization and the Emergence of the United States as a World Power (1870 – Present)
  • US – Reform, Prosperity, and Depression (1919- 1939)
  • US – WII, the Cold War, and International Relations (1939 – 1991)
  • US – Movements and Issues and Home (1945 – 1991)
  • Entering a New Era (1991 – Present)

 

 

OBJECTIVES:         Upon completion of the class the student will be able to:

 

1.                  understand and explain in writing how the various themes and developments help to define eras in U.S. History.

2.                  analyze and evaluate the ways in which the U.S. Constitution and other fundamental documents promote key ideals and principles.

3.                  analyze and evaluate elements of geography to trace the emergence of the United States as a global economic and political force in the pass or present.

4.                  analyze the causes and effects of voluntary and involuntary migration in the United States in the past or present.

5.                  evaluate how individuals and movements have shaped the U.S. (1890 – present).

6.                  evaluate the role of the U.S. government in regulating a market economy in the past or present.

7.                  evaluate and interprets other points of view on an issue within a paper or presentation.

8.                  analyzes the incentives for people’s economic choices in the U.S. in the past or present.

9.                  evaluate the effectiveness of the system of checks and balances during a particular presidential administration, Supreme Court, or Congress.

10.              evaluate the validity, reliability, and credibility of sources when researching an issue or event.

11.              analyze and evaluate how technology and ideas have shaped U.S. History.

12.              understand that nations have competing philosophies about how best to produce, distribute, and consume goods, services, and resources.

13.              analyze how comparative advantage has affected U.S. imports and exports in the past or present.

14.              analyze and evaluate the causes and effects of U.S. foreign policy on people in the U.S. and the world.

15.              analyze multiple causes of events in U.S. History, distinguishing between proximate and long-term causal factors.

16.              analyze how cultures and cultural groups have shaped the U.S.

17.              analyze how an understanding of U.S. history can help us prevent problems today.

18.              evaluate how well court decisions and government policies have upheld key ideals and principles in the U.S.

19.              analyze and evaluate ways of influencing local, state, and national governments to preserve individual rights and promote the common good.

 

REQUIREMENTS: These are the things you must bring to class everyday:

 

                        1.         Paper, pen and/or pencil

2          A positive attitude & Adhere to the 3 R’s:

 

Respect for Self

                        Respect for Others

Responsibility for all you actions!

 

EXPECTATIONS:   To assure a positive and meaningful learning environment the following will be expected and enforced:

 

1.         Be on time - You are required to be in the room when the final bell rings

2.            Students will ask first to use equipment. 

3.             Students are to respect school property and equipment.

4.         Students will be expected to work in teams using team concepts. 

This will be explained in detail later.

8.         Students must use classroom pass and also receive instructor’s permission before leaving class. 

9.         Students are to clean up after themselves.  A general rule of success: 

                                    Leave areas cleaner than you found them.

10.       Above all, act like adults and respect your own space and those of your classmates.

 

GRADES:      Grades based on points under the following criteria:

 

                        Daily Work

                        Projects

                        Essays

                        Articles

                        Tests

                        Participation

                       

ASSIGNMENTS:           More than likely you will have some type of assignment or quiz to turn in daily.  If you are absent you have 1 day for every day of absences to make up.  You are responsible to get notes from your neighbor and all assignments, handouts, notes and quizzes.

 

Syllabus

 

 

Unit  1: Geography
Unit I: Introduction

Unit 2: The Constitution: The Foundation of American Society 
Unit II: Constitutional Foundations for the United States Democratic Republic

Unit 3: The Constitution Tested: Nationalism and Sectionalism 
Unit II: Constitutional Foundations for the United States Democratic Republic

Unit 4: The Reconstructed Nation
Unit III: Industrialization of the United States

Unit 5: The Rise of American Business, Industry and Labor
Unit III: Industrialization of the United States

Unit 6: Adjusting Society to Industrialization: American People and Places
Unit III: Industrialization of the United States

Unit 7: Reform in America
Unit IV: The Progressive Movement: Response to the Challenges Brought About by Industrialization and Urbanization

Unit 8: The Rise of American Power 
Unit IV: The Progressive Movement: Response to the Challenges Brought About by Industrialization and Urbanization

Unit 9: War and Prosperity 
Unit V: At Home and Abroad: Prosperity and Depression

Unit 10: The Great Depression 
Unit V: At Home and Abroad: Prosperity and Depression

Unit 11: Peace in Peril: 1933 – 1950 
Unit VI: The United States in Age of Global Crisis: Responsibility and Cooperation

Unit 12: Peace with Problems: 1945 – 1960
Unit VI: The United States in Age of Global Crisis: Responsibility and Cooperation

Unit 13: Containment and Consensus: 1945 – 1960
(
Unit VII: World in Uncertain Times: 1950 – Present

Unit 14: Decade of Change: 1960s
Unit VII: World in Uncertain Times: 1950 – Present

Unit 15: Limits of Power: Turmoil at Home and Abroad, 1965 – 1972
Unit VII: World in Uncertain Times: 1950 – Present

Unit 16: The Trend Toward Conservatism: 1972 – 1985
Unit VII: World in Uncertain Times: 1950 – Present

Unit 17: Approaching the Next Century: 1986 – Present
Unit VII: World in Uncertain Times: 1950 – Present

 

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